Fire Emblem

From Academic Kids

Fire Emblem (Japanese: ファイアーエムブレム) is a popular strategy and role-playing video game franchise, developed by Intelligent Systems, and published by Nintendo. It is from the developers of Advance Wars, from the Nintendo Wars series. It was created by Shouzou Kaga, who later developed Tear Ring Saga. The Fire Emblem franchise has graced the Famicom, Super Famicom, Game Boy Advance, and there will soon be a version for Nintendo GameCube. It was confined to Japan until the seventh installment, which was released on the Game Boy Advance in 2003. Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken (Blazing Sword), for Game Boy Advance, is the first Fire Emblem game to be localized to North America and Europe. It was released in the United States and Europe under the name of "Fire Emblem" without any subtitle. Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 is the last game on the Super Famicom. The Fire Emblem series was scored by Yuka Tsujiyoko, the composer for Paper Mario who also scored part of Tetris Attack, except Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki, which was scored by Saki Haruyama, Yoshihiko Kitamura, and Yoshito Hirano, under Tsujiyoko's supervision. Shouzou Kaga resigned from Intelligent Systems after Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 and started his own business, Tirnanog.

Death is permanent in a Fire Emblem game if the game progress is saved. Some characters get revived automatically, for example, in Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken, if one character dies in Lyndis's story, they get automatically revived in Eliwood's or Hector's story, but lose valuable level-ups. However, if a leading character dies (for example: Lyn, Eliwood, or Hector in Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken) or if a home base gets seized by the enemy, the story will cease and the chapter must be replayed. Fire Emblem features many character classes. Fire Emblem is remarkable amongst Tactical Role Playing Games in that it is quite easy to learn. The primary system, the Weapon/Magic Triangle, is quite simple. Lance beats sword, sword beats axe, and axe beats lance. In the same vein, Anima magic beats light magic, light magic beats dark magic, and dark magic beats Anima magic(in the case of Seisen no Keifu, the triangle is instead divided between wind, fire, and thunder, with dark magic beating any of these three, and light magic trumping any other magical attack).

The name of Fire Emblem comes from the synopsis of the series first installment that the Fire Emblem was an emblem which was combined with Marth's sword, Falchion (used in Super Smash Bros. Melee), and that only Marth, the wielder of the Emblem, was allowed to wield the Falchion. Marth stars as the betrayed prince in Fire Emblem. Hardin is his traitor.

In 1995, an anime OVA (co-produced with KSS) was produced and released; it was closely based on the first three acts of the very first game in the series or more specifically, the remake contained in Monshou no Nazo. See also Fire Emblem (anime)

Contents

Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryū to Hikari no Tsurugi (Darkness Dragon and Sword of Light), Famicom (1990)

Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryū to Hikari no Tsurugi (Japanese: ファイアーエムブレム 暗黒竜と光の剣) is the very first Fire Emblem game. It takes place in the Akanea continent. It stars Marth, a character who later appeared in Super Smash Bros. Melee. Marth is the first in the Lord class. He is the prince of Altea. His mentor is Jeigan, an old but powerful knight who was sworn to guide and protect Marth all through the game. The heavily armored soldier Doga, the Altea Archer Gordon, and the top Social Knight brothers Kain and Abel are members of Jeigan's squad.

The story of Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryū to Hikari no Tsurugi begins when the Devil King Garnef helps resurrect the Dark Dragon Medeus, allowing the evil Dolua empire to revive as well. As the continent is taken over by Dolua, the Altea King Cornellius is killed, the Falchion (used a century before to kill Medeus by Altea's hero, Anri) is taken, and Marth himself is forced to retreat to Talis with Jeigan's squad. For some time, he lives there without worry, but one day, the Garuda Pirates ambush the people of Talis, forcing Marth to fight back. Now Marth must lead a campaign on a road through the Akanea continent and destroy Medeus, who is at the end of this same road, so that he can liberate the Akanea continent from Dolua's dark grip. Fortunately, he won't have just Jeigan's squad assisting him; the Talis princess Sheeda, Talis captain Oguma, Orleans soldier Hardin, Warren mercenaries Raddy and Shiza, and others are sure to help, along with those Marth finds and helps in the campaign.

Fire Emblem Gaiden (Side-Story), Famicom (1991)

Fire Emblem Gaiden (Japanese: ファイアーエムブレム外伝) is a side story to the original Fire Emblem. It is the last Fire Emblem game on the Famicom. It stars Alm and Celica. Alm and Celica knew each other since they were children. They each run a separate army. Alm's party is usually larger and stronger than Celica's party. Several characters, including Paola, from the original Fire Emblem made a comeback in Fire Emblem Gaiden.

The game takes place in the continent of Valencia, over a span of 5 "Chapters". As each "Chapter" unfolds more of the map is revealed, for players to traverse on. There are two kingdoms: Rigel and Sofia. Alm doesn't know at first, but he is later revealed to be the Prince of Rigel (Rudolf I's son). Celica is the Princess of Sofia, and she also appears to be a priestess of Mira, a goddess. Fire Emblem gaiden was the first Fire Emblem game where the two "Lords" or heroes could actually promote. Alm's starting class is Fighter and he promotes into a Hero. Celica is a Shinkan(神官), or more traditionally known as a Priestess, and she promotes into a Princess.

It should be noted however that some of the Gaiden gameplay mechanisms have finally made a proper comeback in the most recent Game Boy Advance game Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki.

Fire Emblem: Monshō no Nazo (Mystery of the Emblem), Super Famicom (1993)

Fire Emblem: Monshō no Nazo (Japanese: ファイアーエムブレム 紋章の謎) is Fire Emblem's first Super Famicom (SNES) installment. The events of the original Fire Emblem game were reinvented into this game. Monsh no Nazo mainly has the direct sequel to the original game, and also stars Marth. Most of the characters from the original Fire Emblem game returned in Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo. Fire Emblem: Monshō no Nazo held the no. 1 position on the Famitsu chart for one year. Also introduced is the Dismount command, having a cavalier get off a horse. In Fire Emblem: Monshō no Nazo, cavaliers can only use lances when on horseback and swords when on foot. In interior, or in-door, chapters of the game, cavaliers are forced to dismount. The remake and the sequel in Monshō no Nazo are called "Book 1" and "Book 2" respectively. They have two separate soundtracks. As for the recruiting theme, it is in band style in Book 1 and in orchestral style in Book 2. Book 2's soundtrack is more classical. In Fire Emblem: Monshō no Nazo, Hardin betrays Marth.

Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu (Genealogy of Holy War), Super Famicom (1996)

Main Article: Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu

Released in Japan on May 14, 1996, Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu (Japanese: ファイアーエムブレム 聖戦の系譜) is the most imported Fire Emblem game. It has been very popular through emulation in the United States, especially since the release of Super Smash Bros. Melee, which virtually lacks reference to this Super Famicom game, and it is therefore an import classic. Many who played Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu studied Japanese. According to the official Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken site by Nintendo of America, Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu was the most successful game in the Fire Emblem series. It deviates from the standard Fire Emblem gameplay mechanisms to some extent.

Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu takes place in the continent of Jugdral (pronounced YOOG-druhl and based on the Norse mythological name Yggdrasil), located about southeast from Akaneia. The country at the center of Jugdral is called Grandbell. The other countries are the Kingdom of Isaac (pronounced ih-ZAHRK in the game as the katakana transcription suggests, not "eye-zick" as in the Bible), the Kingdom of Silesia, the Lords Dominion of Agustria, Manster District, the Kingdom of Thracia, and the Kingdom of Verdane. The first half of the game stars Sigurd (also known as Siglud, according to Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu: TREASURE), the prince of Chalphy (pronounced SHAL-fee), son of Byron (TREASURE:Vylon), a descendant of Baldo. His Chalphian squad includes Arden (a heavy-armored knight), Noish (a social knight), and Alec (a social knight). He has a younger sister named Ethlin and a brother-in-law and close friend Cuan, prince of Lenster. Sigurd and his forces meet their destiny at the end of the fifth chapter. In chapter two, Sigurd marries Diadora, who first appeared in chapter one. In chapter five, their destiny is delivered by Alvis and the Thracian army. The second half of the game stars Selis (TREASURE: Celice), son of Sigurd, and his forces, who are either children of the characters in the first half or substitute characters that replace them. Fin, a knight of Lenster, is the only character in the game who fights in both halves of the game. He also starred in Fire Emblem: Thracia 776. Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu has great graphics and sound for a Super NES game. Gunpei Yokoi was the producer of this game. Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu has the largest soundtrack of any Fire Emblem game, composed of 114 tracks. It has been considered Tsujiyoko's largest work.

Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu starts off with a prologue beginning with the army of the Kingdom of Grandbell attacking the nearby Kingdom of Isaac, and the army of Verdane invading Grandbell, which has only a handful of remaining soldiers: Sigurd, Noish, Alec, and Arden. The first enemy message is when Edin (TREASURE:Adean), the daughter of Lord Ring, of Jungby Castle gets captured by Gandolf of Marpha Castle of Verdane and gets taken to Verdane. Siglud had no choice but to take up arms in order to rescue Adean. At the end of the prologue, Siglud seizes Evans Castle and makes it his army's home base in Chapters 1 and 2. At the beginning of Chapter 1, Eltshan shows up and meets with Siglud. Meanwhile, Kinbois passes the enemy message to the Genoa Castle army. Then Ira and Shanan from Isaac (pronounced ih-ZAHK in the game) talk with Kinbois, and Ira says no to double-crossing. At the player's second turn, Adean escapes with Dew the thief. After Sigurd conquers Genoa Castle, thus saving Shanan, he convinces Ira to defect to his army. Shortly thereafter, a fight breaks out between Nodion Castle and Evans Castle. The border guard informed Eltshan, the king of Nodion Castle, about the Heirhein Castle army attempting to seize Evans Castle. Eltshan and his cross knights marched on and easily defeated the Heirhein knights, commanded by Elliot.

The storyline of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu comes out to be similar to that of Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo, as Garnef strives to revive the Dark Dragon Medeus, Manfroy strives to revive the Dark Lord Loputousu.

Fire Emblem: Thracia 776, Super Famicom (1999, 2000)

Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 (Japanese: ファイアーエムブレム トラキア776) is the last game ever released for the Super Famicom. Therefore, it is the Super Famicom finale. It is the midquel to Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu. It happens between chapters five and six of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu. It stars Leaf, the son of Cuan and Ethlin; his guardian Fin who took him into hiding in chapter five of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, and a host of many other characters, including characters from Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu. Leaf retaliates against the Thracian army because of what they did to his parents. Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 introduces night combat, which is only portions of the map are shown and the others blacked out. A torch is needed to light the way in night combat. This is also called "fog of war." Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 also introduced the Rescue feature known to players of the US edition of Fire Emblem on GBA, although in this game, you can capture enemies. Some characters from Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, including Fin, have been carried over to Thracia 776, and some other Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu characters have been merely mentioned in Fire Emblem: Thracia 776, such as Sigurd, Levin, Beowulf, and Lachesis. The graphics of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 are slightly better than those of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu. It is the most realistic Fire Emblem game as of now.

Spoiler Warning: Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 contains spoilers for Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, both in Japanese and in English. Therefore, it is not recommended to play Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 before playing Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu for the first time.

Fire Emblem: Fūin no Tsurugi (Sword of Seals), Game Boy Advance (2002)

Fire Emblem: Fūin no Tsurugi (ファイアーエムブレム 封印の剣) stars Roy, who later appeared in Super Smash Bros. Melee. It takes place on the continent of Elibe (or Ereb, in the original Japanese version.) Roy led a campaign known as the Lycian League against the forces from the militant country of Bern shortly after his father fell ill. He is the son of the Marquess of Pherae.

The story begins when King Zephiel, ruler of the Kingdom of Bern began to invade Ilia and Sacae, constantly conducting massacre on those who dared to interfere with his plans. Roy was sent home to lead the Pherae's army to join the war, but soon after meeting Guinivere, the princess of Bern; and through the Lycian League stalwart general Hector's faithful farewells, Roy carried on the Lycian League and made many promises: to protect Guinivere, Hector's beloved daughter Lilina, and most importantly to save the entire continent from Zephiel's mysterious thirst for world domination.

Fire Emblem: Fūin no Tsurugi has been released in Japan in 2002, but rumors had spread about its U.S. release being on its way as well. There is an online download that is an English translation of the game.

Fire Emblem: Fūin no Tsurugi also has versions of songs from Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu. The arena battle theme was originally the player battle theme of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu. The recruit theme of Fire Emblem: Fūin no Tsurugi is the same as the recruit theme of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu.

Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken (Blazing Sword), Game Boy Advance (2003)

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Screenshot Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken

Main Article: Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken

Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken (Translation: Blazing Sword or Sword of Fire, Blazing Sword being the most popular term) is the first Fire Emblem game to be released in the United States. It was developed with a North American release in mind. It is the prequel to Fire Emblem: Fin no Tsurugi, in which you battle a group called the Black Fang. The first part stars Lyndis, the first female character to be in the Lord class. That may make her a lady. The later part stars Eliwood (Roy's father). The alternate later part stars Hector, the first member of the Lord class to wield an axe. Although most of Hector's quest is the same as Eliwood's, his quest features a handful of addtional levels and characters, as well as an overall increased difficulty (which is even more pronounced in the hard mode). If anyone of these 3 lords dies at any point in the game, the game is over. The game has an in game tutorial (Lyn's Quest) and versions of songs from the original Fire Emblem game (Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi) and Fire Emblem: Thracia 776. The recruit theme of Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken was originally the recruit theme of Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi. The arena battle theme of Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken was originally the player battle theme of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776.

Fire Emblem: (US: The Sacred Stones JP: Seima no Kōseki), Game Boy Advance (JP: 2004, US: 5/23/2005)

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Screenshot Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones

Main Article: Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones

Fire Emblem: Seima no Kōseki is the third portable Fire Emblem game on Game Boy Advance. Unlike the previous two, this one takes place on a brand new continent called Magvel, which was populated by evil monsters. Men once sealed the evil forces using the five Holy Jewels, which later became heirlooms to the five different royal families. The game starts out with the Empire of Grado conquering the Kingdom of Renais. Unfortunately, the crown prince, Ephraim, was away and knowing that he would not stand much chance against the Imperial army, King Fado ordered the loyal Seth to escort Princess Eirika and seek help from the neighboring Kingdom of Frelia.

Henceforth you could start gathering new characters to improve you fighting force. Despite starting the game as Eirika, you would later be reunited with your twin brother and then be given the choice to choose your own main Lord between the two. The following chapters would then be different depending on your choice. You would then begin on your quest to pay visit to the many countries of Magvel and gather allies in order to defeat the villain who unleashed this unspeakable power of darkness in the first place. Seth gives Ephraim and Eirika their divine weapons, which are the Siegmund and Sieglinde respectively.

The game boasts sub-maps and a class change system that allows the player to select a class to upgrade to. It also beefs up level-building capability. Fire Emblem: Seima no Kōseki has a gameplay engine reminiscing that of Fire Emblem Gaiden.

Fire Emblem: Seima no Kōseki was scored by Saki Haruyama, Yoshihiko Kitamura, and Yoshito Hirano, and under the supervision of Yuka Tsujiyoko. The arena battle theme of Fire Emblem: Seima no Kōseki was originally the player battle theme of Fire Emblem Gaiden.

The official website can be found at http://www.nintendo.co.jp/n08/be8j/

Fire Emblem: Seima no Kseki was released in the U.S. as Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones on May 23, 2005.

Fire Emblem: Sōen no Kiseki (US: Path of Radiance JP:Miracle of the Blue Flame), GameCube (JP: 4/20/2005 US:10/??/2005)

Fire Emblem: Sōen no Kiseki (Japanese: ファイアーエムブレム 蒼炎の軌跡) is the recently announced new game in the series for the Nintendo GameCube, the first one for a console since the release of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 for the Super Famicom; since no game in the series was released for the Nintendo 64, this game will be the first Fire Emblem title with 3D graphics. Additionally, the game takes place in a land called Telius and features a completely new cast. The graphics will be rendered in a cel-shaded manner similar to Dragon Quest VIII, Dark Cloud 2, and The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker. It has been speculated that this decision was made in order to soften the animated violence and/or preserve the graphical style of previous titles in the series. Nintendo has confirmed that this game will be released outside Japan.

Fire Emblem: Sōen no Kiseki will be the first game from Nintendo to use Full Motion Video, and, like Final Fantasy X, the game makes good use of that.

Sources can be found here (http://www.nintendo.com/gamemini?gameid=064dae74-388d-44f3-a005-d210477b5571) (English) and here (http://www.nintendo.co.jp/n08/ae7j/sinsaku/index.html) (Japanese).

Notes and regional record

Two Fire Emblem characters, Marth and Roy, are secret characters in Super Smash Bros. Melee. Marth starred in Fire Emblem: Ankoku no Ry to Hikari no Tsurugi (Dragon of Darkness and Sword of Light), and Fire Emblem: Monsh no Nazo (Mystery of the Emblem). Roy starred in Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi (Sealed Sword). Super Smash Bros. Melee virtually lacks reference to Fire Emblem Gaiden, Seisen no Keifu, and Thracia 776. According to the official Japanese site of Nintendo, Marth was put in Super Smash Bros. Melee upon Japan's request, although Fire Emblem was unheard of in North America and Europe prior to the time of Super Smash Bros. Melee. He was developed for Super Smash Bros. Melee expecting that he would be dummied out of the North American version of the game. However, he was well-crafted, earning him extended attention in North America. Eventually, by the decision of Nintendo of America, he was included in the North American version of Super Smash Bros. Melee the same way as in the Japanese version. Roy was developed for Super Smash Bros. Melee for the purpose of advertising Fire Emblem: Fin no Tsurugi. Marth and Roy later became immensely popular in North America and Europe.

Of the Fire Emblem series, the games before Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken were marketed exclusively in Japan. The last Japan-only installment, Fire Emblem: Fin no Tsurugi still has a chance for localization to North America and Europe. Fan translations of the first five Fire Emblem games are underway, being translated from Japanese to English. North America has been showing interest in the Fire Emblem series since the invention of game emulation, or since the release of Super Smash Bros. Melee. If any of the Fire Emblem games before Rekka no Ken get remade for Nintendo GameCube or later Nintendo console, they will probably get the opportunity to come to North America, Europe, and Australia.

Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door has a reference to Fire Emblem.

History-making characters

Several Fire Emblem characters have made history in the Fire Emblem series.

  • Marth - From Fire Emblem: Ankoku no Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi and Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo, is the first Lord, and, also, the only Lord who kept his position during two games. He also appeared as a secret playable character in Super Smash Bros. Melee.
  • Celica - From Fire Emblem Gaiden, is the first female main character.
  • Siglud - From Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, is the first in the Lord class to have exceptional stats and the first Lord to be mounted on a horse.
  • Lex - From Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, is the series' first axefighter on horseback.
  • Ira - From Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, is the first popular female swordfighter, and the first female character to start a class that is also held by male characters. She is one of the most popular Fire Emblem characters. She is the originator of the Myrmidon and Swordmaster classes, which is what many call their favorite class.
  • Leaf - From Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu and Thracia 776, is the first in the Lord class to have a hair color that is not blue.
  • Roy - From Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi, is featured as an unlockable character, similar to Marth but with more power and less speed, in Super Smash Bros. Melee. He appeared in Super Smash Bros. Melee before appearing in his own Fire Emblem game. Additionally, he makes a cameo appearance as a child in Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken.
  • Sue - From Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi, is the series' first female archer on horseback. She is the daughter of Rath from Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken.
  • Lyndis - From Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken, is the first female character to be in the Lord class. A female Lord is sometimes called a Lady.
  • Hector - From Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken, is the first in the Lord class to wield an axe.
  • Eirik (Eirika) - From Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki, is the first female character to be the game's main Lord all the way through game ending.
  • Ephraim - From Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki, is the first in the Lord class to wield a lance on foot.

Fire Emblem traditions and terminology

  • Jeigan - A term used for a prepromoted character who starts out to be a vastly strong unit, but deteriorates in utility throughout the game, levels up very slowly, gains almost no experience against enemies who are otherwise advantageous against other characters, has extremely low stat growths, and becomes surpassed by most of the game's initially unpromoted units and ends up being a completely worthless unit by the end of the Fire Emblem game, but is a mentor to a character holding the Lord class, and is usually a Paladin. The original Jeigan character, Jeigan himself, appears at the beginning of Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi and Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo Book 1, as Marth's mentor. In Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo Book 2, he appears as a non-playable character. Aran of Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo Book 2 is Jeigan on steroids. Other Jeigan characters include Oifey of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, Dagdar of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776. Marcus of Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi and Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken, Seth of Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki, and Tiamate of Fire Emblem: Souen no Kiseki. Seth is the strongest Jeigan, and Oifey is the second strongest Jeigan. Jeigan characters are appealing to players who are new to the Fire Emblem video game franchise, but they are usually frowned upon by larger fans. Dagdar is the first non-Paladin Jeigan (he is a Warrior). Tiamate is the first female Jeigan.
  • Est - A term used for an unpromoted unit who seems to be worthless at first, but has very high stat growths and ends up being a vastly strong unit by the end of the game. Therefore, Est is the opposite of Jeigan. The original Est character, Est herself, appears late in Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi and in Book 1 of Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo. She also appears a bit earlier in Book 2. Farina, Florina, Rebecca, and Nino are Est-like characters of Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken.
  • Doga - A term used for a heavy-armoured unit who is big and strong and reliable. Apart from the original Dohga character, such characters include Bors of Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi, Oswin of Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken, and Gilliam of Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki. Marty of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 is also part-Doga with high overall defensive ability for a non-Jeigan who joins in Chapter 1.
  • Kain - A term used for a very handsome man who is a red-armoured or orange-armoured cavalier (or some other unpromoted class) and has ties with a green-armoured cavalier, and who prefers to use swords, and relies on strength and defense. Other than the original Kain character, such characters include Noish of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, Halvan of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776, Alan of Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi, Forde of Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki, and Kevin of Fire Emblem: Souen no Kiseki. Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken is mixed up on the Kain and Abel tradition. Kent has Kain's colors and Abel's characteristics. Halvan is an axefighter instead of a cavalier. Kevin is restricted to axes until promotion.
  • Abel - A term used for a green-armoured or jade-armoured cavalier (or some other unpromoted class) who has ties with a red-armoured cavalier, and who prefers to use lances and relies on speed, skill, accuracy, and luck. Other than the original Abel character, such characters include Alec of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, Othin of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776, Lance of Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi, Kyle of Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki, and Oscar of Fire Emblem: Souen no Kiseki. Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken is mixed up on the Kain and Abel tradition. Abels are somewhat less handsome than Kains. Sain has Abel's colors and Kain's characteristics. Oscar is restricted to lances until promotion.
  • Oguma - A term used for a sophisticated swordfighter who is a mercenary and knows good values of a swordfighter, and has high HP and strength and maxes out early in the game. The original Oguma character, Oguma himself, appears in Chapter 1 of Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi and Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo Book 1. Oguma is as good in Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo Book 2 as he is in Book 1. Other Oguma characters include Holyn of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, Dieck of Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi, Raven of Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken, and Jist of Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki. There is no Oguma in Fire Emblem: Souen no Kiseki.
  • Nabarl - A term used for a swordfighter who is very swift, faster than the Oguma character, appearing first as a dangerous enemy and difficult to recruit, and that the recruiting is found to be worth the effort all throughout the game, and is a good-looking character, usually an effeminate male character or beautiful female character. The original Nabarl character is, natch, Nabarl, who appears as an enemy in Chapter 3 of both Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi and of Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo Book 1, chasing Julian and Rena along with the Samshan bandits, and recruited to Marth's army by Sheeda. Nabarl also fights in Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo Book 2. He is the only Nabarl character who is a Mercenary, while the other Nabarl characters are Swordmasters. Other Nabarl characters include Ayra of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, Rutger and Fir of Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi, Guy of Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken, Joshua (Jhosua) and Marika of Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki, and Zihart of Fire Emblem: Souen no Kiseki. Ayra is the first female Nabarl and the most difficult one to recruit. She is the strongest of all Nabarl characters and the only Nabarl character without a Kill Sword but has Ryuuseiken skill instead. Some Fire Emblem fans consider her an original character. Lakche, Shanan, Mareeta, and Wayu do not count as Nabarls, because they do not start off as enemies. Nabarl characters are usually killed off as enemies by players who are new to the Fire Emblem video game franchise, but they, especially Ayra, are well praised by larger Fire Emblem fans. Nabarl characters sometimes become the favorite character for some fans who onced killed them off in the first playthrough.
  • Julian - A term used for a thief who seems to be useless but has the potential to be useful in battle, not just in map interaction. Julian characters will typically support your army's cause naturally. The original Julian character is, natch, Julian, who is first found trying to help Rena escape from the Samshan Bandits in Chapter 3 of both Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi and Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo (although he and Rena already show up as blue units right at the get-go). Other Julian characters are Deu from Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu 1st Generation, Pati/Daisy of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu 2nd Generation, Rifis of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776, Chad of Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi, Matthew of Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken, and Corma of Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki.
  • Rena - A term used for a female healer who is used very frequently throughout most of the game and is a sophisticated healer. The original Rena character, that is, Rena herself, appears with Julian and is being pursued by Nabarl. Other Rena characters include Adean (Edin) of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu 1st Generation, Lana of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu 2nd Generation, Ellen of Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi, Serra of Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken, Natasha of Fire Emblem: Seima no Kouseki, and Mist of Fire Emblem: Souen no Kiseki.
  • Maric - A term used for a magic-using character who has highly rated characteristics, usually using Wind magic, and often vies in competition with the Oguma and/or Nabarl character of the same game. The original Maric character, Maric himself, appears in Chapter 4 of Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu To Hikari No Tsurugi and Book 1 of Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo. In Book 2 of Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo, Maric appears in Chapter 9 as a character to be saved from attack and then joins Marth's army in the following chapter. Levin, the Maric character of Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu and the prince of Silesia, fights during the first half and serves as an advisor during the second half. Asvel is the Maric character of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776.
  • Ellis - A term used for a magic-using character who joins late and doesn't really make up for it if your characters are built up well enough. The original Ellis character, Ellis, along with Copul, the Ellis character of Fire Emblem: Seisen No Keifu, both start at very low levels. The other noteworthy Ellis characters are Yodel of Fire Emblem: Fuuin No Tsurugi and Renault of Fire Emblem: Rekka No Ken, both of whom have disappointing stats for their high levels.
  • Gato - A term used for a character who joins VERY late, usually last, but with above average stats so that the armies that enter the last section of the campaign with weak characters can stand a chance. The original Gato character, Gato himself, was playable only in the last chapter of Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu To Hikari No Tsurugi but was not made playable in either Book of Fire Emblem: Monshou No Nazo. Other Gato characters include Sety of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 and At(h)os of Fire Emblem: Rekka No Ken.

Mythological references

Fire Emblem has extensive mythological references. For example, Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu has extensive references to Norse, Celtic, Greek, and Polynesian mythology. Sigurd of Chalphy, Edin (Etain) of Jungby, Isaac Kingdom's Balmunk sword, Mistoleen (Misteltein), Mjolnir (Mjlnir), Chalphy's Tailfing (Tyrfing) sword, and Thracia Kingdom's Gungnir spear are references to Norse mythology. Cuan (Cchulainn/Cian), Ethlin (Ethniu), and Fin (Fionn) of Lenster, and Mideel (Midir) of Jungby (Yngvi), from Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, Felgus from Fire Emblem: Thracia 776, Lugh from Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi, and Erk from Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken are references to Celtic mythology. Rackesis (Lachesis) is a reference to Greek mythology. Paora from Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo, and Ira and Mana from Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu are references to Polynesian mythology. Norse mythology and Celtic mythology are prominent contributors to names in the Fire Emblem series.

See also

Soundtrack - MIDI

External links

Template:Wikiquote Sites:

Forums:

  • FESS Forum (http://s7.invisionfree.com/FESS/) - Large Fire Emblem dedicated forum.
  • Fire Emblem Fusion (http://www.fefusion.com) - Dedicated to Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken.
  • The Forgotten Emblem Forum (http://s4.invisionfree.com/The_Forgotten_Emblem) - Another forum dedicated to Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken.
  • Fire Emblem Wars (http://s4.invisionfree.com/Fire_Emblem_Wars) - A Fire Emblem RPG Forum

Misc:

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